Alcohol is often mixed with other illegal drugs, which can have serious implications for your health. In extreme cases, mixing two chemical substances can have fatal consequences. For example, when combining alcohol with a stimulant drug such as cocaine or amphetamine, the two substances will fight against each other as one has a sedative effect while the other is a stimulant. The result is a huge amount of pressure on the brain and central nervous system. 3 Tips About How to Go to Rehab Without Insurance - Drug and Alcohol Addiction Help
Stress, anger, frustration, self-esteem issues, depression, anxiety, trauma – all of these and more can be overwhelming to a person, driving them to seek relief of any kind from any source. Without positive coping skills to help handle issues, many turn to drugs and alcohol and, with repeated use, they spiral out of control into psychological and physical dependence.
Numerous studies have proven that Antabuse is effective in the treatment of alcoholism and alcohol abuse. Antabuse has been used since 1951. (The generic name of Antabuse is Disulfiram.) Antabuse is not only effective in treating alcoholism, it is also helpful in treating drug addiction. If you have a drug problem, anything that helps you stop drinking will also help you stop using drugs, because alcohol usually leads to drugs.
As alcohol abuse progresses from dependency to addiction, your need for alcohol will become increasingly overwhelming. You may start to spend more and more of your time drinking or thinking about drinking, leaving little time for anyone or anything else. This can affect your ability to take care of responsibilities at home and work, and can have a negative impact on your relationships with family members, friends, and work colleagues.
The Hazelden Betty Ford Center is one of the most successful and well-recognized addiction recovery organizations in the nation. They have many treatment centers from the west to the east coast. Hazelden Betty Ford uses evidence-based treatment, the traditional 12-step program and specialized programs for patients based on mental disorders and even occupation. The center recommends at least 90 days for residential treatment, for the best rates of success. They have a reported 80% rate of recovery. The center has a complete, multidisciplinary treatment team; small group sizes; and a low patient-to-counselor ratio.

Stimulants like cocaine and meth can cause long-lasting damage to the brain, altering the way you think, feel and experience reality. Drug addiction facts from the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry highlight that chronic cocaine use can cause the brain to shrink, a condition called cerebral atrophy. Long-term cocaine use can cause cognitive impairment even after the drug is no longer used, while those who have used methamphetamine may continue to experience hallucinations and psychotic episodes after quitting.


The euphoric high, exaggerated self-confidence, and energizing sensations of cocaine have made this drug one of the most popular substances of abuse in the US. Because cocaine acts on the brain’s natural reward circuitry, the drug is highly addictive, and withdrawal can cause an abrupt emotional “crash” into depression. The 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health listed cocaine as one of the country’s top three drugs of dependence, with 1.1 million American adults reporting addiction to cocaine or crack. Only marijuana and prescription pain medications were more widely abused.

Alcohol dependency is not a failure of will or lack of strength of character, as was believed for many years. However, progress in science over the last few decades has shown us that alcoholism is rooted in both biology and behaviour, making it a ‘bio-behavioural disorder’. Biology and behaviour are two sides of the same coin, and alcohol dependency cannot be treated by just focusing on one side alone.
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Nalmefene, an opiate antagonist that is similar in its chemical structure to naltrexone, is one of the most recent drugs being investigated for the treatment of alcoholism. Like naltrexone (sold as ReVia, Depade, or Vivitrol), nalmefene deprives the person struggling with substance use of the pleasurable feelings associated with drinking. But nalmefene is less toxic to the liver than naltrexone. As of 2013, nalmefene was still undergoing clinical trials through the U.S. National Institutes of Health before receiving FDA approval. From Rehab to a Body Bag | Dying for Treatment: VICE Reports (Full Length)
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