Having 24-hour supervision, intensive care, and access to treatment are some of the major benefits of inpatient rehab, as they increase the chance of recovery. Another benefit of inpatient rehab is the change in scenery. Individuals battling drugs or alcohol, or with a co-occurring disorder, often associate a particular place or even person with the struggle. For some people, it might be their basement or the local bar. For others, it might be their “drinking buddies.” And for others, just being home alone might be enough to trigger substance use or symptoms of a particular mental health disorder.
Nicole Lee works as a paid consultant in the alcohol and other drug sector. She has previously been awarded grants by state and federal governments, NHMRC and other public funding bodies for alcohol and other drug research. She is a member and past President of the Australian Association for Cognitive and Behaviour Therapy. She is a registered Psychologist who has previously worked in private practice.
Alcohol is also linked to self-harm, psychosis, and suicide and because it can impair judgement and lead to reckless, compulsive behaviour, many people who take their own lives do so while under the influence of alcohol. In fact, NHS Scotland has said that over half of all hospital admissions related to deliberate self-harm have a direct link to alcohol either immediately before or during the act.
Many treatment plans begin with a detoxification program to help break your body’s physical addiction to alcohol. Detoxification is often performed in an inpatient therapy treatment center or hospital. It typically takes one week to complete. Because the symptoms of physical withdrawal can be dramatic, you may also be given medications to help prevent:
Drugs are built to interfere with those messages, causing the release of too many neurotransmitters for the wrong behavior—taking drugs. This causes a huge spike in pleasure for a destructive activity that eclipses normally pleasant activities needed for survival. Drug use also prevents normal reuptake of these brain chemicals, throwing off the entire process and your natural balance, altering your mood. Soon, all that matters is to produce that flood of neurotransmitters again—and due to the addiction, there’s just one way to do that: drug use.
Drug addiction is a disease of the body and brain. Also called substance use disorder, drug addiction triggers uncontrollable behaviors and renders a person unable to control their use of medication, alcohol, cigarettes, or drugs—whether they are legal or not. Addictive substances such as nicotine, alcohol, opioid medications, and marijuana are considered drugs just as much as heroin, cocaine, or methamphetamine. Once you are addicted to a substance, you will feel compelled to use it, regardless of the damage that use does to your body, your brain, and your life.
People who may benefit especially from secondary care include those who have completed treatment at rehab but do not yet feel physically or mentally prepared to reintegrate fully into day-to-day life with all its attendant stresses and pressures. Secondary care facilities are not typically as strictly monitored and secure as rehab itself, but those living on site at such a facility need to abide by certain rules – most importantly, staying clean and sober for the duration of their stay.
Historically, drug addiction and those suffering with it were maligned as morally weak people who made bad choices. This pure behavioral model, however, fails to account for the biological changes that addiction triggers in the body and brain. Furthermore, it overlooks the issue of comorbidity; many people who are addicted to drugs also suffer from mental health problems and use drugs to self-medicate for those problems.
One study performed in Norway demonstrated that brief advice given early can affect gamma glutamyl transferase levels and reported alcohol consumption. Early warning makes a difference to persons who drink heavily. In a study of 200 workers with alcoholism, recalling a physician's warning about drinking at the beginning of the study was associated with a better prognosis 2 years later. Unfortunately, less than 25% had received warnings from their physicians, again illustrating the problem of missed diagnosis.
Stress, anger, frustration, self-esteem issues, depression, anxiety, trauma – all of these and more can be overwhelming to a person, driving them to seek relief of any kind from any source. Without positive coping skills to help handle issues, many turn to drugs and alcohol and, with repeated use, they spiral out of control into psychological and physical dependence.
Alcohol is one of the most commonly abused substances in the world. If not treated, alcohol addiction can destroy mental and physical health, derail careers, and damage personal relationships. If you or a loved one feels trapped and needs help with alcohol addiction, Passages Malibu’s world-renowned addiction treatment center could be the answer you’re looking for. We offer comfortable and effective individual addiction treatment therapy to help you end your addiction forever. Our luxury treatment program is the most sought after in the world, and we would honor the opportunity to welcome you into our facility. It’s not just the extraordinary amount of one-on-one attention you will receive, or our luxurious facility-it’s our progressive treatment philosophy that sets us significantly apart from our competitors.

With the Sinclair Method, people only take Revia or Vivitrol before drinking and never otherwise. Revia and Vivitrol are not like other anti-alcohol drugs that cause intense sickness and hangover sensations when taken with alcohol. The change in behavior only appears over time. With the Sinclair Method, Revia or Vivitrol is taken one hour before drinking alcohol. At the end of four to six months of treatment with the Sinclair Method, 80 percent of people who had been overusing alcohol are either drinking moderately or abstaining entirely.


Most severe alcohol withdrawal symptoms occur in the first three to four days after stopping drinking. Detoxification involves taking a short course of medication to help reduce or prevent withdrawal symptoms. Medications such as Valium (diazepam), Librium (chlordiazepoxide), or Ativan (lorazepam), members of the benzodiazepine family, are usually used for detox.

We tend to recommend inpatient treatment to patients suffering from alcohol addiction. An inpatient programme offers a safe and secure environment free from distraction. It provides the ideal atmosphere for allowing patients to focus solely on recovery without having to worry about anything else. And because inpatient treatment is more focused, it better facilitates the kind of long-term recovery we want for our patients.

Inside the magnificent grounds at Passages, you'll find the most comprehensive and sophisticated treatment program in the world. When founders Chris and Pax Prentiss created this program in 2001, they began with one goal in mind — to create the world’s finest team of treatment professionals. Your team will be comprised of nurses, psychologists, family therapists, trainers, acupuncturists, hypnotherapists, spiritual counselors, and many others, ensuring your complete satisfaction from the day you check in until the day you graduate from our world-class drug rehab center.


Addiction can be either behavioral or substance related. An intense feeling of emotional need or physical craving characterizes them both. Both types of addiction carry a number of other similarities, but behavioral addiction does not possess the same physical symptoms that accompany drug addiction. Experts disagree on the similarities and differences between the symptoms and consequences of the types of addictions.
Around 21 percent of alcoholics are in their 20s, but they started drinking much earlier. Many come from families where one or more adults abused alcohol or drugs. The majority of people in this group have at least one co-occurring psychiatric disorder, such as antisocial personality disorder, depression, bipolar disorder, or anxiety. Most abuse other drugs in addition to alcohol. Approximately 33 percent seek treatment for alcoholism; some of these individuals are referred into rehab by the correctional system.w

You can support your drug treatment and protect yourself from relapse by having activities and interests that provide meaning to your life. It’s important to be involved in things that you enjoy, that make you feel needed, and add meaning to your life. When your life is filled with rewarding activities and a sense of purpose, your addiction will lose its appeal.

If you live in a very rural area and or do not have the ability to attend traditional support groups, online support groups may prove to be incredibly beneficial for you. Nearly all of the support groups that offer in-person meetings also offer online meetings. These meetings are almost always completely free of charge and offer fellowship, support, encouragement, and advice from recovering alcoholics who used to be in the same exact position you are in now. If anyone can give you helpful advice, it's them.
Whether you’re struggling with an addiction to prescription drugs, street drugs, marijuana, or other substances, we’re here to help. At The Recovery Village, we offer specialized treatment services to support you through the rehabilitation process, from detox to therapy, discharge planning, and aftercare. Call our intake counselors at any time for information about our recovery services. Best Drug Rehab
Substance abuse therapy: Used as a part of many inpatient and outpatient programs, therapy is one of the cornerstones of drug addiction treatment. Individual, group and family therapy help patients and their loved ones understand the nature and causes of addiction. Therapy teaches coping strategies and life skills needed to live a productive, sober life in the community. For individuals with a co-occurring mental illness, intensive psychotherapy can also address psychiatric symptoms and find the underlying issues that contribute to addiction. Inside Shalom House, Australia’s ‘strictest’ drug rehabilitation | Australian Story
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