The best way to tell your loved ones that you’re addicted is to be as honest and as open as possible. Be prepared for the possibility that they won’t understand your disease — even today, many people don’t realize that addiction is a chronic condition on the same level as diabetes, cancer, or hypertension. Your loved ones may criticize you; they may even try to persuade you that you don’t have a problem. It’s important to stand firm in your new self-awareness and stay on track with your plan for treatment.

People who misuse alcohol are often addicted to the act of drinking, as much as the alcohol itself. For that reason, you may need to learn skills and coping mechanisms to help you avoid alcohol once you leave a treatment center or return to familiar environments where the urge to drink may be stronger. Your doctor may refer you to a counselor or other treatment program to help you learn those skills and coping strategies.

Insurance: Many types of insurance cover the cost of addiction treatment and rehab; in particular, the Affordable Care Act requires that insurance policies issued under the state health exchanges and through Medicaid programs under the ACA expansion must provide coverage for addiction treatment. It’s important to note that insurance coverage often still requires that the individual provide a co-insurance payment, and some require a deductible be paid before treatment will be free. Specific plans may have different coverage levels, so it’s a good idea to check the specific policy or talk to the insurance provider.
Drug rehab centers range from very basic facilities to luxury treatment centers. The type of center a patient attends depends upon his or her budget and level of insurance coverage. While luxury centers offer more amenities than basic facilities, they are not always the best treatment centers. Patients should investigate a rehab facility before making a final decision.
A program with principles that contradict the patient’s religious beliefs or personal values is unlikely to be effective. For instance, a patient who objects to spiritually-based recovery probably won’t be comfortable at a facility that places a strong emphasis on 12-step programming. When choosing a treatment facility, look for a program that meshes with the individual’s spiritual nature and cultural heritage.
We also have a heated swimming pool so you can enjoy the outdoors and the benefits of aqua fitness that extends the summer months. Our activities will also organise crafting workshops, computer skills training, and much more so you can get back or reignite that creative spark that was put on hold all during drug addiction. The grounds of Searidge Drug Rehab feature a large outside space full of green pastures and a stone’s throw of the ocean that will help you enjoy nature’s beauty that is conducive to rest, relaxation and recovery.
In many cases, symptoms of the mental health disorder appear first. As they become more and more overwhelming, the patient may attempt to “treat” those symptoms by using different drugs. For example, a patient who struggles with depression may attempt to improve their mood by taking heroin or prescription drugs. Patients who are living with anxiety may try to calm themselves by smoking marijuana. Conversely, someone dealing with an eating disorder may attempt to further their weight loss attempts by abusing stimulant drugs like cocaine or crystal meth.

Today, more than 7 million people suffer from an illicit drug disorder, and one in four deaths results from illicit drug use. In fact, more deaths, illnesses and disabilities are associated with drug abuse than any other preventable health condition. People suffering from drug and alcohol addiction also have a higher risk of unintentional injuries, accidents and domestic violence incidents. Rehab Near Me in Huntington Beach, CA

Hallucinogenic drugs. Hallucinogens are psychoactive drugs that affect the way you experience the world around you. A few of the most popular hallucinogenic drugs include Ecstasy, LSD PCP, and mushrooms. The effects of hallucinogenic drugs can range from pleasant sensory distortions and feelings of empathy to terrifying hallucinations and violent impulses. These psychedelic substances are popular among young people, many of whom are introduced to hallucinogenic drugs at clubs, raves, concerts, or parties. Although hallucinogenic drugs are commonly believed to be non-addictive, clinical research has shown that drugs like Ecstasy can cause signs of physical and psychological dependence, including withdrawal symptoms, obsessive thoughts, and cravings.

Since those with moderate to severe alcohol addiction can benefit from medication that must be prescribed by a medical professional, start with your primary care physician. He or she can start the assessment process, work with an addiction counselor to provide the right prescriptions, and monitor your overall health during the recovery process. Alternatively, you can contact a counselor or rehab facility directly to schedule an assessment and begin the rehabilitation process.


Both issues are exceedingly dangerous; neither should be ignored. Drug abuse turns into drug addiction, and both problems are deadly in their own right. If your loved one is struggling with drug abuse or addiction – no matter what their drug of choice – contact us at Axis today to learn more about how we can provide the healing options that will change their life for the better.
Before taking Antabuse you should give your doctor your entire medical history. You may not be a able to take Antabuse if you have a significant medical history of heart or blood vessel disease, diabetes, an underactive thyroid, brain disorders (e.g., seizures, brain damage), kidney disease, liver disease, a history of severe depression, a history of psychosis, or a history of suicide attempts. Antabuse can alter the metabolism and blood levels of certain drugs, especially tricyclic antidepressants, Dilantin (phenytoin), coumadin, isoniazid, and theophylline.
Nalmefene, an opiate antagonist that is similar in its chemical structure to naltrexone, is one of the most recent drugs being investigated for the treatment of alcoholism. Like naltrexone (sold as ReVia, Depade, or Vivitrol), nalmefene deprives the person struggling with substance use of the pleasurable feelings associated with drinking. But nalmefene is less toxic to the liver than naltrexone. As of 2013, nalmefene was still undergoing clinical trials through the U.S. National Institutes of Health before receiving FDA approval. From Rehab to a Body Bag | Dying for Treatment: VICE Reports (Full Length)
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