Various factors such as your medical history, support system and personal motivation can all play a role in the success of your recovery. Treatment should be supervised by a team of medical specialists at a rehab facility. Throughout the country, alcohol treatment centers are staffed with professionals who will guide you through each step of the recovery process – from detox to life after rehab. Think of them as your 24/7 support system who are there to celebrate your successes and work with you through any challenges.

NOTE: This fact sheet discusses research findings on effective treatment approaches for drug abuse and addiction. If you’re seeking treatment, you can call the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA's) National Helpline at 1-800-662-HELP (1-800-662-4357) or go to www.findtreatment.samhsa.gov for information on hotlines, counseling services, or treatment options in your state.  

Almost all alcoholics who have been chronic, heavy drinkers will experience some level of withdrawal symptoms when they suddenly stop drinking. These symptoms can range from mild shakes and discomfort to life-threatening delirium tremens -- which can include confusion, hallucinations, convulsions, autonomic instability, and death. Long-time, heavy drinkers who decide to quit drinking should seek medical assistance first.
Ask for friends and family to support you in the recovery process; chances are, they’ll be proud of you for taking control of your life again. External support groups include Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), which originated the 12-step program and now has approximately 2 million members. The 12 steps emphasize the participant’s ability to submit to a “higher power” to ask for help. The higher power doesn’t have to be rooted in religion, though that is the case for many. Others look for a “higher power” within.
If you checked one to three boxes from each of the two checklists, there’s a strong chance that your loved one has an alcohol problem. However, some of these signs could also be red flags for a mental or physical illness. Encourage your loved one to be evaluated by a physician or therapist. Talk to him or her about alcohol abuse, and express your support for further treatment, such as therapy, counseling, or a 12-step program. You or your loved one can also call a free alcohol hotline for more information. Drug Addict Couple Torn Apart For Rehab | The Jeremy Kyle Show
In such cases, some rehabs offer outpatient services: the addict can go through the detox phase with medical help as and when required, and can then visit the facility for therapy sessions by appointment. Indeed it is often also possible to have phone therapy sessions if the addict cannot make it physically to the facility (this is often the case with professionals who travel a great deal and may not be in the country for an extended period).

Residential drug treatment can be broadly divided into two camps: 12-step programs and therapeutic communities. Twelve-step programs are a nonclinical support-group and faith-based approach to treating addiction. Therapy typically involves the use of cognitive-behavioral therapy, an approach that looks at the relationship between thoughts, feelings and behaviors, addressing the root cause of maladaptive behavior. Cognitive-behavioral therapy treats addiction as a behavior rather than a disease, and so is subsequently curable, or rather, unlearnable. Cognitive-behavioral therapy programs recognize that, for some individuals, controlled use is a more realistic possibility.[28]


We believe that those in the midst of alcohol recovery need access to constant care and attention. The staff at our treatment centres answer the call. They are on hand 24 hours a day to ensure patients get the care they need, when they need it. We believe this to be one of the primary reasons for reaching out to us in your search for the best alcohol rehab centre.
To begin this process and to find these treatment options, a person dealing with drug or alcohol addiction can get in touch with their state or local mental/behavioral health or substance abuse services. These are often part of larger public or community health agency networks within the government. SAMHSA maintains a Directory of Single State Agencies (SSA) for Substance Abuse Services to make it easier for people to find out whom to contact. The state’s government websites can also provide information on these services and how to apply for them.
Acamprosate, disulfiram and topiramate (a novel anticonvulsant sulphonated sugar) are also used to treat alcohol addiction. Acamprosate has shown effectiveness for patients with severe dependence, helping them to maintain abstinence for several weeks, even months.[13] Disulfiram (also called Antabuse) produces a very unpleasant reaction when drinking alcohol that includes flushing, nausea and palpitations. It is more effective for patients with high motivation and some addicts use it only for high-risk situations.[14] Patients who wish to continue drinking or may be likely to relapse, should not take disulfiram as it can result in the disulfiram-alcohol reaction mentioned previously, which is very serious and can even be fatal[13] Guilt, Shame, Depression And The Cycle Of Addiction, Recovery And Relapse - John Flaherty
Before entering a rehab facility, patients may have to undergo detox treatment. Detox is the process in which a patient rids his or her body of the addictive substance. From start to finish, this process varies in length, but often takes about a week. As part of a medical detox program, recovering patients will be monitored by doctors and nurses and given medications to manage withdrawal, when appropriate. Once a patient completes detox, he or she is ready for rehab.
More problematically, they are also not removed from their home environment which has proven to facilitate the drug-taking behaviour which has led to addiction, and are still able to contact their dealer/s if the temptation to relapse proves overpowering. Their whole recovery rests upon their strength of will – which in some cases may not prove sufficient at critical times.
After the detoxification stage, you will begin rehabilitation. This involves a wide range of different therapies and treatments to help you combat drinking urges and triggers. During this stage, you will also learn coping skills that can be applied to everyday situations after leaving rehab. The rehabilitation stage may take place in an inpatient or outpatient setting, depending on the severity of your alcoholism and what your doctor recommends.

Neurons communicate with each other by sending messages along axons and dendrites via electrical impulses. The axons turn these impulses into chemical signals, sending neurotransmitters across synapses. The receiving dendrite then converts neurotransmitters back into the right electrical signals, so we understand the message; for example, that bite of pie was delicious, I’ll take another one. These exchanges happen countless times in the brain, and they control mood, behavior, movement, and cognition.
Seek advice and support from others. Counselors, therapists, and support groups can be valuable sources of advice when you’re trying to deal with an addicted loved one. A substance abuse therapist can give you pointers on how to communicate effectively with someone who’s in denial. Twelve-step groups like Al-Anon or Nar-Anon can offer support and coping strategies, as well.
Drug addiction is a condition that is characterised by repeatedly taking or administering drugs - whether these are illegal drugs such as heroin, cocaine, or MDMA/ecstasy, or legal prescription drugs - to the extent that you become both physically and psychologically dependent on these substances. Regardless of the type of drug addiction that you have developed, continued drug use can soon become a serious problem and can lead to a range of serious long-term consequences, and may even be fatal.

Nalmefene, an opiate antagonist that is similar in its chemical structure to naltrexone, is one of the most recent drugs being investigated for the treatment of alcoholism. Like naltrexone (sold as ReVia, Depade, or Vivitrol), nalmefene deprives the person struggling with substance use of the pleasurable feelings associated with drinking. But nalmefene is less toxic to the liver than naltrexone. As of 2013, nalmefene was still undergoing clinical trials through the U.S. National Institutes of Health before receiving FDA approval. From Rehab to a Body Bag | Dying for Treatment: VICE Reports (Full Length)
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