Completing a residential drug rehab program can be rewarding and healing, but without effective aftercare in place returning home presents the risk of falling into old habits. Aftercare provides the security and support needed to renew and reinforce the tools and techniques implemented at Searidge Drug Rehab. While the journey into the real world can be overwhelming; addiction recovery is a lifestyle change and commitment that simply does not end a month’s time or so away at a residential drug rehab.
Drug addiction is defined by the existence of both psychological dependence and physical dependence on at least one illicit substance, according to PubMed Health. Marijuana, cocaine, crystal meth, heroin, synthetic drugs and even prescription drugs that can be effective medically are highly addictive. There are a number of reasons why someone may develop an addiction, but recovery comes the same way to everyone: through comprehensive treatment that addresses individual obstacles to sobriety.

Instead, you should follow the procedures and mechanisms worked out during your therapy, and take all steps agreed upon to minimise your exposure to risk. During therapy you will have worked to identify triggers which can set off the desire to consume drugs; now, in the outside world, it is your responsibility to avoid those triggers in any way possible.
We are active in supporting research into improving the lives of those struggling with addiction. Searidge Foundation and our sister rehab Sobriety Home located in Godmanchester, Quebec are highly regarded as the leading alcohol and drug rehab facilities in Canada. We support Florida State University (FSU) in their research into addiction and anxiety disorder. We are also involved with Dr. Brunet, of McGill University, and his leading scientific research on PTSD and addiction memory. Drugs & Addiction : How to Deal With a Drug Addict

As a person in long term recovery, He has been working to help people find recovery from addiction in some fashion for 12 + years either as a sponsor, mentor, or as a professional in clinical environments.  At CRTC he works to formulate practical, action-based plans to transition our clients into healthier states of mental and emotional processing.
There are many places to turn for help. Not everybody requires medically supervised detox or an extended stint in rehab. The care you need depends on a variety of factors, including your age, drug-use history, medical or psychiatric conditions. In addition to doctors and psychologists, many clergy members, social workers, and counselors offer addiction treatment services.

It is important to recognise that without expert support, your alcohol addiction has the potential to become increasingly worse over time, resulting in a detrimental impact on all areas of your life including your ability to function, your relationships with others, your performance at work, and your general health and wellbeing. Untreated alcohol addiction may also lead to the development of drug addictions and other behavioural addictions. This why seeking expert help is crucial in order to overcome your alcohol addiction and resume the healthy, fulfilling, addiction-free life that you deserve.


Immediately upon entering alcohol rehab, the first step is to undergo a complete diagnostic evaluation. Both physical and psychological, this process is an information-gathering period which will allow the medical team to better formulate a specific treatment plan that will address your individual needs. It is especially important to note acute medical issues brought on by alcohol abuse and co-occurring mental health issues that will require immediate attention.
Inpatient treatment, also referred to as residential treatment, provides clients with many benefits that other programs don’t, whether they’re struggling with drugs, alcohol or both. Because mental health issues often go hand in hand with addiction, The Recovery Village offers inpatient behavioral health treatment and inpatient substance abuse treatment together when needed. Some of the common co-occurring disorders include depression, anxiety and eating disorders. Inpatient care includes a number of programs designed to meet the physical and mental needs of men and women. When compared to outpatient treatment, inpatient care is more intensive, and with the many facilities throughout the country, there’s a great chance you’ll find an inpatient facility near you.
Of those treatment methods that are medically approved, not all are equally effective in terms of providing the best possible basis for a permanent recovery. It’s generally agreed that residential rehabilitation – “rehab” – is the best approach to treating addiction, and has consistently delivered the highest rate of success. Of course, every addict is unique and responds differently to different types of treatment, different therapy models, different medications et cetera; however, the medical and therapeutic staff at rehab have experience of working with countless individuals and their expertise can be invaluable when it comes to optimising your own journey to recovery.
There is a wide range of alcohol rehab programs, including inpatient, outpatient, day-patient, and evening programs. Inpatient rehab facilities are the most structured. Generally, these programs run for 30, 60, or 90 days. There is a benefit to stepping out of your environment so that you can completely focus on recovery without any distractions, as in an inpatient program. However, that is not an option for many people. 5 Benefits of Alcohol Rehabilitation
Detox is the first step in helping your brain and body heal from substance abuse. The detox process begins with evaluations by medical doctors and nurses to determine which, if any, medical interventions are needed. Detox is primarily a time to flush the chemicals from your body, which can be an uncomfortable experience without the right medical care to help ease discomfort and/or drug cravings. Hazelden Betty Ford medical staff will work with you to evaluate your level of discomfort and provide you with medications, if needed, to address any discomfort or cravings.
The Benchmark Recovery Center, formerly known as the Mark Houston Recovery Center, bases their treatment program on a 90-day, 12-step program. Part of the program includes life skills and a fitness program. The Center recognizes that every patient has unique needs to achieve recovery, so it avoids the one-size-fits-all approach to treatment. The Center consists of two separate facilities for men and women; it can provide for 58 patients at a time and currently claims a 74% success rate.

People who misuse alcohol are often addicted to the act of drinking, as much as the alcohol itself. For that reason, you may need to learn skills and coping mechanisms to help you avoid alcohol once you leave a treatment center or return to familiar environments where the urge to drink may be stronger. Your doctor may refer you to a counselor or other treatment program to help you learn those skills and coping strategies.
Just as some people with diabetes or asthma may have flare-ups of their disease, a relapse to drinking can be seen as a temporary set-back to full recovery and not a complete failure. Seeking professional help can prevent relapse — behavioral therapies can help people develop skills to avoid and overcome triggers, such as stress, that might lead to drinking. Most people benefit from regular checkups with a treatment provider. Medications also can deter drinking during times when individuals may be at greater risk of relapse (e.g., divorce, death of a family member).
Residential drug treatment can be broadly divided into two camps: 12-step programs and therapeutic communities. Twelve-step programs are a nonclinical support-group and faith-based approach to treating addiction. Therapy typically involves the use of cognitive-behavioral therapy, an approach that looks at the relationship between thoughts, feelings and behaviors, addressing the root cause of maladaptive behavior. Cognitive-behavioral therapy treats addiction as a behavior rather than a disease, and so is subsequently curable, or rather, unlearnable. Cognitive-behavioral therapy programs recognize that, for some individuals, controlled use is a more realistic possibility.[28]
The term opioids describes natural opiates, such as morphine, and synthetic drugs made from opium. These drugs are used medically as pain relievers. They work by binding to opioid receptors in the brain and other organs in the body, reducing an individual’s perception of pain. Opioids include heroin and opium as well as prescription medications such as fentanyl, oxycodone and methadone.
Support groups provide people with understanding peers and ongoing support, in church basements, community centers, and public facilities scattered all across the country. Here, people can come together to discuss addiction’s difficulties, and they can meet with other addicted people to gain support and insight. Alumni groups are similar, in that they link peers together to discuss addiction, but these groups contain people who all worked within the same facility for help.
An individual who suffers from both mental illness and alcoholism will need to undergo different treatment. Because alcohol withdrawal symptoms cause a person to experience some psychiatric stress, an alcoholic with mental health issues will find it much more difficult to resist turning to drink. The NIAAA believes the some self-help groups, such as Alcoholics Anonymous, are not effective when it comes to treating people with a dual-diagnosis of both alcoholism and mental illness. This is because these groups tend to specifically focus on the actual addiction itself, rather than any underlying psychological problems. Anti-depressants are improving all the time and it is believed that while a self-help group may not be useful for a dual-diagnosis individual by itself, if the individual is on the appropriate medication and receiving the appropriate psychological therapy it can prove to be just as effective as with other alcoholic individuals. Addiction Recovery: 12 Steps and Beyond (TTA Podcast 321)
The important thing to remember is that relapse doesn’t mean drug treatment failure. Don’t give up. Call your sponsor, talk to your therapist, go to a meeting, or schedule an appointment with your doctor. When you’re sober again and out of danger, look at what triggered the relapse, what went wrong, and what you could have done differently. You can choose to get back on the path to recovery and use the experience to strengthen your commitment.
Drug rehabilitation services can be a source of strength for people who have fought addiction for months or years. Drug centers typically employ a variety of methods to overcome substance use disorder, including programs that range from medical detox to inpatient and outpatient programs. By understanding the drug rehab process, you can choose the best fit for you or a loved one.
The action stage of change represents full recognition of a problem along with observable evidence of steps taken to reduce alcohol use. The clinician should reinforce and praise the decision to change. Emphasizing that the biggest error at this stage is to underestimate the amount of help needed to quit drinking is critical. The patient should be given a list of options for treatment including AA and pharmacotherapy.

We are active in supporting research into improving the lives of those struggling with addiction. Searidge Foundation and our sister rehab Sobriety Home located in Godmanchester, Quebec are highly regarded as the leading alcohol and drug rehab facilities in Canada. We support Florida State University (FSU) in their research into addiction and anxiety disorder. We are also involved with Dr. Brunet, of McGill University, and his leading scientific research on PTSD and addiction memory.
Without a proper withdrawal recovering alcoholics are at risk of experiencing some or all of the symptoms mentioned above. The most common ones are chills or sweats, anxiety and depression and irritability and mood swings. More severe cases can lead to seizures, blackouts or DTs (delirium tremens). Untreated withdrawal symptoms peak in the first few days of detoxification. Every individual experience of detox is different, depending on the level of alcohol abuse. This can last from a few days to six with a varying level of severity. Our experienced medical team will work to help alleviate the associated risks and symptoms.
Over time, most users need more and more of the same drug simply to achieve the same effects they experienced when consuming a lower dosage less frequently. Eventually, the user must have the drug simply to function and avoid feeling sick or terrible; this is one of the hallmarks of addiction. Stopping use of the drug often causes intense cravings, which is another symptom of withdrawal and addiction.
3. The meat of the program (psychotherapy and behavioral treatments) – This is one of the most important phases of rehabilitation, as it begins to give you a base for future sobriety. During this phase, you work with an alcohol counselor to address your current mental and emotional condition and understand where it’s coming from.  Then, you can start to make behavioral and attitudinal changes to remain sober, prevent relapse, and start living a happy life. If you are dedicated – the chances for your alcohol rehab program to work are increases and you have made significant steps towards becoming sober long-term.
An influential cognitive-behavioral approach to addiction recovery and therapy has been Alan Marlatt's (1985) Relapse Prevention approach.[40] Marlatt describes four psycho-social processes relevant to the addiction and relapse processes: self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, attributions of causality, and decision-making processes. Self-efficacy refers to one's ability to deal competently and effectively with high-risk, relapse-provoking situations. Outcome expectancy refer to an individual's expectations about the psychoactive effects of an addictive substance. Attributions of causality refer to an individual's pattern of beliefs that relapse to drug use is a result of internal, or rather external, transient causes (e.g., allowing oneself to make exceptions when faced with what are judged to be unusual circumstances). Finally, decision-making processes are implicated in the relapse process as well. Substance use is the result of multiple decisions whose collective effects result in a consumption of the intoxicant. Furthermore, Marlatt stresses some decisions—referred to as apparently irrelevant decisions—may seem inconsequential to relapse, but may actually have downstream implications that place the user in a high-risk situation.[41]
If faith-based rehabilitation and professional rehab clinics are not viable options for you, look into state funded free alcohol addiction treatment. These programs are entirely funded by tax dollars and vary from one state to another. Some offer long-term treatment including residential care, while others offer only short-term treatment consisting primarily of detoxification. You won't know what your state can offer you until you ask. It may just be your ticket to sobriety.
Physical dependence on a drug can cause serious withdrawal symptoms if a person suddenly stops using the substance or severely reduces the dose. The withdrawal process itself can be uncomfortable and dangerous. Some of the classic signs of withdrawal include tremors, cold sweats, involuntary movements (e.g., jerking, twitching, or shaking), nausea and vomiting, muscle cramps and bone pain. Because withdrawal can be dangerous, proper medical detox can be a life-saving step in recovery. Sunrise Foundation Rehabilitation Center in India near Mumbai

If you or a loved one is suffering from drug addiction, you may be looking for help curing the disease. One of the most well-known methods is drug rehab. However, many people don’t realize that “drug rehab” is a broad-encompassing term that represents various treatment methods. The type of drug rehab that you choose could depend on an array of factors.

Like any other life-threatening disease, drug addiction requires intensive treatment by credentialed specialists. While some may be able to find recovery alone, true healing is a lifelong process that typically requires continued support. Drug addiction treatment options range from medical detox and inpatient care to 12-step programming, pharmacotherapy and outpatient services. Throughout a continuum of care, patients are offered resources, skills and support to ensure that they’re making progress toward recovery goals.

Alcoholism can also be categorized into 2 types: early-onset (biological predisposition to the disease) or late-onset (brought on by environmental or psychosocial triggers). Understanding and studying the difference between early- and late-onset alcoholism facilitate the selection of the appropriate therapy. Drugs that affect the rewarding behavior of neural activities, such as ondansetron, naltrexone, topiramate, and baclofen, have been shown to alter drinking behavior. [46]

Addiction affects not just the addict but also everyone that person comes into contact with. The addict will likely suffer physical consequences, social consequences, emotional consequences, financial consequences, and perhaps even legal consequences as a result of their drug use. As the drug addict’s personal life falls apart, their work and health will likely suffer as well. Drug addicts are more likely to have domestic violence problems, to lose their jobs, and to be arrested than those who are not addicts, proving that addiction, if left untreated, can negatively impact every facet of a person’s life.
A large body of scientific evidence has been gathered in recent years to show that addiction can run in families. In fact, children of alcohol-addicted parents are four times more likely to develop alcohol addiction in later life than those born to parents without alcohol addictions. How this works is complex, and there is no one ‘alcohol gene’ to blame for this; instead a number of genetic variations, which mean some individuals are more pre-disposed to alcoholism than others.
The specific medicines prescribed will vary depending upon your own particular experience of withdrawal and the symptoms you are manifesting, and it may be that certain medications will not be appropriate depending on your substance of abuse or your own personal health history; an experienced medical professional will be able to make those decisions to ensure you go through withdrawal as safely as possible. What happens in rehab?
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