Alcohol addiction treatment at Priory is delivered as part of a comprehensive Addiction Treatment Programme. Our Addiction Treatment Programmes typically last for 28 days, and consist of you staying at one of our nationwide hospital sites on a residential basis, for the duration of this time. During treatment, you will have the opportunity to undergo a medically assisted withdrawal detoxification process if this is required, before undergoing intensive individual and group addiction therapy in order to address the source of your addictive behaviours, increase your self-awareness and take steps towards recovery. Whilst 28 days is the recommended treatment time for alcohol addiction, treatment lengths at Priory can be flexible according to your unique needs, requirements and commitments. 5 Benefits of Alcohol Rehabilitation
Partial hospitalization is the next step in the continuum. Intensive outpatient programs are also available. These programs usually include a full schedule of therapy and drug treatment throughout the day, with the ability for clients to return home at the end of the day. Some rehab facilities offer partial hospitalization programs with on-site housing.
We offer each resident their own private room and bathroom to provide a personal space where they can recharge after a workout, reflect after a therapy session or take a nap. While group therapy sessions are an important part of our program at Searidge Alcohol Rehab, we respect and value the importance of a private room of one’s own. We strive to deliver the best alcohol recovery treatment possible to each and every resident while offering outstanding comfort and total privacy. Alcohol Detox Program
Pharmaceutical opiates are now considered to be a more serious threat to public health than illicit drugs like heroin or cocaine. The widespread popularity of prescription analgesics like Vicodin (a combination of hydrocodone and acetaminophen), oxycodone (OxyContin), and Percocet (a combination of oxycodone and acetaminophen) has made these drugs much more accessible to Americans, many of whom obtain the drugs without a prescription. The journal Pain Physician reports that out of the 5 million Americans who admitted to abusing pain relievers in 2010, only 17 percent obtained the drugs through a legitimate prescription.
In the United States, there are many government-issued services and resources that can help with alcoholism. One of the most common, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), serves as an information hub and treatment referral service. Additionally, more states are focusing on affordable treatment options to make sure anyone who is in need of treatment receives help. Unfortunately, with an increasing demand for alcoholism treatment services, many government-funded programs have wait lists and other requirements such as financial and medical need.
We know how you might be feeling right now because all of our helpline advisors have been in your position before. We wish to give you the belief that achieving long-term recovery from alcoholism is possible when you select a suitable recovery programme. If you believe your alcohol-use is beginning to control your life, then you are probably suffering from an addiction.
We review all of these options with each outgoing resident to make sure that they have the best plan to work with their routines and needs. Whether you are able to engage with the program for hours or minutes, we will find the simplest and most effective way for you to participate in our aftercare program. We want you to succeed and will do everything we can to make this final stage both accessible and productive in order to support you in maintaining sobriety on your own time.
If a person is experiencing seizures and hallucinations when attempting to stop drinking, it may be due to a condition called delirium tremens (DTs). This is a serious condition that requires medical intervention to detox from alcohol. Because of the risk of DTs, a person struggling with alcoholism should never attempt to quit drinking altogether. In order to withdraw from alcohol, medical detox is required.
A small number of therapies have been well researched, so we know they are effective in alcohol and other drug treatment. These include cognitive behaviour therapy, which helps to strengthen skills to manage cravings and difficult situations or emotions that might trigger a relapse and motivational interviewing, which helps to develop and strengthen the motivation to change, is also effective.
Many chronic conditions such as arthritis or diabetes carry a risk of recurrence, even after years of successful medical management. In a similar way, there will always be a possibility of relapse for those in recovery.1 However, finding a reputable treatment program that utilizes evidence-based treatment (and staying in treatment long enough—NIDA recommends at least 3 months) gives people a head start on sobriety and gives them the tools they'll need to prevent relapse.2

An influential cognitive-behavioral approach to addiction recovery and therapy has been Alan Marlatt's (1985) Relapse Prevention approach.[40] Marlatt describes four psycho-social processes relevant to the addiction and relapse processes: self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, attributions of causality, and decision-making processes. Self-efficacy refers to one's ability to deal competently and effectively with high-risk, relapse-provoking situations. Outcome expectancy refer to an individual's expectations about the psychoactive effects of an addictive substance. Attributions of causality refer to an individual's pattern of beliefs that relapse to drug use is a result of internal, or rather external, transient causes (e.g., allowing oneself to make exceptions when faced with what are judged to be unusual circumstances). Finally, decision-making processes are implicated in the relapse process as well. Substance use is the result of multiple decisions whose collective effects result in a consumption of the intoxicant. Furthermore, Marlatt stresses some decisions—referred to as apparently irrelevant decisions—may seem inconsequential to relapse, but may actually have downstream implications that place the user in a high-risk situation.[41]


The specific medicines prescribed will vary depending upon your own particular experience of withdrawal and the symptoms you are manifesting, and it may be that certain medications will not be appropriate depending on your substance of abuse or your own personal health history; an experienced medical professional will be able to make those decisions to ensure you go through withdrawal as safely as possible. What happens in rehab?
×