Gateway Rehab has been providing proven and personalized services in and around the Pittsburgh area, to individuals struggling with addictive diseases for many decades. As the region’s premiere non-profit addiction recovery center, Gateway Rehab continues to pioneer progressive and comprehensive treatment models, helping to free countless people from the anguish of substance use disorders. Through respect for the individual, a reverence for life and unwavering belief in the promise of every human being, Gateway Rehab offers a life-changing opportunity of recovery to anyone who walks through our doors.
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Oral medications. A drug called disulfiram (Antabuse) may help prevent you from drinking, although it won't cure alcohol use disorder or remove the compulsion to drink. If you drink alcohol, the drug produces a physical reaction that may include flushing, nausea, vomiting and headaches. Naltrexone, a drug that blocks the good feelings alcohol causes, may prevent heavy drinking and reduce the urge to drink. Acamprosate may help you combat alcohol cravings once you stop drinking. Unlike disulfiram, naltrexone and acamprosate don't make you feel sick after taking a drink.
Traditional alcohol treatment programs rely on evidence-based strategies such as psychotherapy, behavioral modification therapy, peer group counseling, nutritional counseling and 12-step programs. Rehabilitation begins with detox, a cleansing process that allows the patient to withdraw safely and comfortably from alcohol. After detox, the patient participates in a structured series of therapies that are designed to help him or her modify destructive behaviors and create a sober life. A rehab jail for heroin addicts
People who are addicted to drugs need to be in a drug-free environment with people who will hold them accountable for their goal of getting off drugs. Drug rehab may begin with detoxification, which helps the addict rid his or her body of the drugs and treat any withdrawal symptoms. Not everyone needs to go through detox, but detox alone is not enough treatment to effectively break the addictive cycle long-term. Once detox is completed, the real work of addiction treatment begins.
Ongoing support and aftercare are essential to this type of sustained, long-term recovery. Many drug abuse rehab centers feature robust aftercare programs, including ongoing individual therapy sessions on a periodic basis, group therapy meetings, and alumni events. Oftentimes, alumni are also encouraged to get involved in their own recovery community by participating in 12-step meetings or residing in a sober living home. If recovering addicts have people they can turn to for support when they are tempted to relapse, they are more likely to stand strong and resist the urge to use again.

"The most robust finding in the study is that those receiving any medication did much better than those who received no pills at all," says Professor Barbara Mason, Scripps Research Institute, and an author of the study. "This should be a wake-up call. With less than one percent of those seeking help for alcohol dependence receiving a prescription, medication is underutilized. Medication for alcoholism can offer patients an advantage for their recovery, especially in a real-world setting." 9 Signs Of A High Functioning Alcoholic
Of the therapy options available, this is undoubtedly one of the more unique. Psychology Today shares that the program is therapeutic, relying on specialized activities such as acting and role-playing. It could also utilize tools such as music, arts and crafts, or guided imagery. The goal is to simulate emotional situations that have occurred in relationships due to addiction.
Once you determined whether or not your loved one requires an inpatient drug treatment program and decided how long he or she should stay, what else should you look for in an effective drug rehab program? There are a number of characteristics that signify a positive, safe, and efficient environment for your loved one that will promote growth and healing physically, mentally and emotionally. The Cycle Of Addiction - Unf*ck Yourself From The Modern World (E442)
If you checked one to three boxes from each of the two checklists, there’s a strong chance that your loved one has an alcohol problem. However, some of these signs could also be red flags for a mental or physical illness. Encourage your loved one to be evaluated by a physician or therapist. Talk to him or her about alcohol abuse, and express your support for further treatment, such as therapy, counseling, or a 12-step program. You or your loved one can also call a free alcohol hotline for more information.

The hidden cost of alcoholism does not stop with health. Alcoholism is also linked to violent crime, resulting in a cost to the economy in terms of policing and prosecution. However, it is difficult to put a price on the impact that alcoholism has to society. A report by the IAS showed that a figure of £21 billion is regularly quoted by the Government in terms of the cost of alcohol to society (in England and Wales). This does not include the personal cost of alcoholism and only considers the cost that is imposed on others.
Drug rehab is crucial for individuals addicted to drugs. The combination of therapies and medical detox helps patients stop using illicit substances and learn how to live a sober life.The bad news is some patients may find the number of drug rehabilitation programs available to be overwhelming. The good news is there are many treatment options available so every patient can find a program that meets his needs.
Treatment is sometimes intensive at first, where patients attend multiple outpatient sessions each week. After completing intensive treatment, patients transition to regular outpatient treatment, which meets less often and for fewer hours per week to help sustain their recovery. In September 2017, the FDA permitted marketing of the first mobile application, reSET®, to help treat substance use disorders. This application is intended to be used with outpatient treatment to treat alcohol, cocaine, marijuana, and stimulant substance use disorders. In December 2018, the FDA cleared a mobile medical application, reSET®, to help treat opioid use disorders. This application is a prescription cognitive behavioral therapy and should be used in conjunction with treatment that includes buprenorphine and contingency management. Read more about reSET® in this FDA News Release.
At the end of an intervention, the stage is set for entry into addiction treatment programs. There are many different options out there. Some facilities, for example, offer inpatient treatment for addiction. These programs allow people to step away from their day-to-day concerns and tackle an addiction around the clock, every single day. For some people, that tight focus is an ideal setup for healing. But outpatient centers can be ideal for those who want to stay at home, surrounded by family, while they work on addictions to alcohol. It’s a personal decision that families can make in consultation with the person who needs help.
When a person is struggling with both a mental illness and substance use disorder, it can be difficult to identify the issues and treat them both. Many treatment facilities focus solely on the symptoms of substance use, without treating the mental health issues that may contribute to addiction. Finding a center that specializes in co-occurring disorder treatment can help identify the roots of a substance use disorder and equip patients with the tools they need for lifelong recovery.
contribute to mental illness including depression and anxietycause significant liver damage, ultimately preventing the liver from functioningcontribute to developing one of several different kinds of cancerincrease your chances of developing heart diseaseincrease your chances of using other drugscontribute to developing chronic hypertensionlead to the loss of your job and, as a result, financial instabilitydo irreparable harm to your marriage/family relationshipslead you to a life controlled by addictionlead you to a life of crime as you seek to support your addiction.
Nalmefene, an opiate antagonist that is similar in its chemical structure to naltrexone, is one of the most recent drugs being investigated for the treatment of alcoholism. Like naltrexone (sold as ReVia, Depade, or Vivitrol), nalmefene deprives the person struggling with substance use of the pleasurable feelings associated with drinking. But nalmefene is less toxic to the liver than naltrexone. As of 2013, nalmefene was still undergoing clinical trials through the U.S. National Institutes of Health before receiving FDA approval. From Rehab to a Body Bag | Dying for Treatment: VICE Reports (Full Length)
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